News: M205 Petrol-Marbled Special Edition Announced

Pelikan M205 Petrol-Marbled Fountain PenFor those of you that keep up with Pelikan’s usual cycle of releases, you know that by the end of March in most years, we’ve already had news of two and sometimes up to three new fountain pens.  Sadly, this year, like the one before it, is not like most years.  That unfortunate fact, made evident by the dearth of new releases out of Hannover, is almost certainly attributable to the chaos that the coronavirus pandemic has wrought upon supply chains across the globe.  The drought may be coming to an end however as Atlas Stationers out of Chicago, IL broke news of Pelikan’s next release via their website this evening.  The next pen to market will hail from the company’s Classic line and carry the moniker of M205 Petrol-Marbled.  Petrol is a color scheme that Pelikan has employed with pens from some of their other lines including the Pura, Jazz, and Twist.  Pelikan’s new marbled finish will combine blues and greens in a way that, to me, is reminiscent of the M805 Ocean Swirl from 2017.  Rather than a standard addition to the line-up, this one looks to be a special edition release, intended only as a limited run.  The Petrol-Marbled is reportedly targeted for a mid to late April 2021 ship date.  I would expect most vendors to start taking pre-orders soon.

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How A Pelikan Found Her Song: Center Stage With The Rare And Exotic Music Nib

I must implore you at the outset to forgive my jubilation over this post and ask that you indulge my exuberance.  Today we take a look at something special, something not often seen, a rarity even amongst a brand that has created its fair share of unique and uncommon goods over nearly a century of pen making.  What I’m alluding to is the Pelikan music nib or musikfeder in its native tongue.  For some reason, I cannot think of telling the story of how I came across this nib without the soundtrack to Frank Oz’s 1986 big screen adaptation of “Little Shop Of Horrors” running through my mind, specifically set to the tune “Da-Doo.”  With your leave; So there I was, browsing around Yahoo! Auctions in Japan one day and I passed by a bunch of listings where I sometimes find weird and exotic pens ’cause you know that Pelikans are my hobby.  They didn’t have anything unusual there that day so I was just about to, ya know, browse on by, when suddenly, and without warning, there was this strange Tortoiseshell Brown 400NN.  It had a nib like something from another world just, you know, stuck in, among the 140s and M800s.  Thank you for letting me get that out of my system.  The nib was unique indeed.  It had two slits and three tines with the pre-1954 Pelikan lettering below.  I could hardly believe my eyes but was almost certain that I was looking at one of Pelikan’s fabled music nibs.  I had to wait six days for that auction to conclude and fight hard during the last thirty minutes of bidding but, in the end, I prevailed which is great for me and good for you because it allows me to give you an up close and personal look at this seldom seen specialty nib.  Of course, just for a bit of added drama, the pen got lost in the mail for a short time while on its way to me but all’s well that ends well.

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Review: M405 Silver-White (2020)

Pelikan M405 Silver-WhiteWhile we await official news of this year’s upcoming releases, I wanted to take one last look back at a model from last year.  I have already reviewed the M205 Moonstone and the M600 Tortoiseshell Red so this time I will be performing a shakedown of the M405 Silver-White.  Pelikan has embraced the use of white resin over the past several years, predominantly amongst their M6xx models.  This time around, rather than something in a medium size, the company has decided to instead show some love to their M405 line which consists of smaller pens by today’s standards.  The M405 series has only been around since 2002 and the Silver-White is just the fifth pen to grace the line.  It is also the first of its line to incorporate white resin into its design.  The other M405 models are the Black, Blue-Black, Dark Blue, and Stresemann.  Upon first glance, the Silver-White has a very similar appearance to 2017’s M605 White-Transparent.  The major difference between the two are their size and the barrel’s striping.  What makes the M405 Silver-White worth reviewing is the fact that it is not a limited or special edition but rather a release added to the standard line-up meaning that you will have time to pick this one up should it suit your fancy.  The Silver-White is a very solid release but brings nothing new to the table.  Read on to find out if this is the pen that you’ve been waiting for.

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Pelikan’s #350: An Eastern Oddity Of The Classic Line

Pelikan #250 and #350How well do you know Pelikan’s Classic/Traditional line?  Not as well as you might think I’m willing to wager.  Let us review; M100, check.  M150, check.  M200, M205, M215, and M250; check, check, check, and check!  Many of those model lines have since been discontinued but a few still persists and are being expanded to this day, some 35 years after the series’ introduction.  There is another entry into that line-up that is not nearly as well known and easily overlooked, even by the most hardcore of collectors.  Enter the #350.  There is a lot to unpack here so please bear with me.  First, let’s tackle that hashtag or number sign.  Most of Pelikan’s fountain pens have an ‘M’ or a ‘P’ preceding the model number.  These designate either a Mechanik-Füller (piston filling) or Patronen-Füller (cartridge) fountain pen respectively (though exceptions exists).  The ‘#’ was widely used in Japan during the 1980s and 90s for many of Pelikan’s piston filling models sold in that market and is therefore an appropriate regional prefix.  You might recall that I first introduced the concept when detailing the Mitsukoshi #660.  In addition to the unusual prefix, model numbers also sometimes differed.  For instance, the M400 used to retail in Japan as the #500.  Today, the regional sales literature generally adheres to the M/R/K/D prefix scheme and model numbers used elsewhere.  The #350 will be easier to understand when its predecessor, the #250, is considered so I will detail both of those models in this post.  Japan has long been a fertile ground for some of Pelikan’s most interesting releases, models not widely available anywhere else.  The Maruzen Tortoiseshell Brown M600, the Mitsukoshi #660, the East/West reunification commemorative M800, and the Merz & Krell 400NN re-issue were all either exclusive to the Japanese market or came about as a result of that market’s influence.  Read on to learn how the #250 and #350 models fit into Pelikan’s Classic series.

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News: Pelikan’s US Price Increases For 2021 And The Trends That Might Surprise You

Graph with dollar symbol illustrating rising pricesI haven’t yet had a chance to officially wish all of you reading the blog a Happy New Year!  If you blinked, you may have missed it but a mailer from Fahrney’s Pens at the end of last year alluded to a price increase for some of Pelikan’s products in 2021.  The actual header read, “Certain models increase in price effective January 1.”  The United States has seen a steady rise in prices for Pelikan’s fine writing instruments and inks over the last several years.  Some of that is to be expected due to inflation, fluctuations in manufacturing costs, and the numerous other factors that play into market pricing.  Still, the United Sates remains home to some of the highest prices for Pelikan’s products anywhere around the globe.  Increases this year may be more justified than years past due to the economic realities brought about by the coronavirus pandemic.  It’s without dispute that every step of the manufacturing process has been impacted.  Raw materials are harder to source and production costs have risen.  For the most part, ink pricing has remained stable and some pen pricing is relatively flat.  On the one hand, we see some notable increases for models within the Classic series and on the other, some small reductions in Souverän pricing.  Across the board, effective January 1st, 2021, there was what looks to be an average increase of nearly 5% in the company’s MSRP across all product lines for the United States’ market.  Read on to get a sense of which of your preferred products may have been affected.

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News: Edelstein Ink of the Year 2021 – Golden Beryl

Pelikan Edelstein Ink of the Year 2021 Golden BerylWe have seen a release schedule upended and product slow to make its way into retail channels thanks to a pandemic which came to define 2020.  Still, the show must go on and Pelikan seems ready to rise to the challenge of brightening all of our spirits, both figuratively and literally.  The first new product of 2021 comes in the form of the next Edelstein Ink of the Year release.  This year’s selection is nothing short of astonishing as Pelikan has decided to break new ground by introducing its first ever shimmering ink to the Edelstein line, a top request per the company’s social media accounts.  The 2021 Ink of the Year will be none other than Golden Beryl.  The silver-gray hue of Moonstone now gives way to a yellow-golden ink with shimmering qualities, perhaps the biggest departure from any past release to date.  Golden Beryl will mark its debut as the eighteenth gemstone inspired ink in the line-up and it will be the tenth Ink of the Year, soon to be counted amongst the likes of  Turmaline (2012), Amber (2013), Garnet (2014), Amethyst (2015), Aquamarine (2016), Smoky Quartz (2017), Olivine (2018), Star Ruby (2019), and Moonstone (2020).  As of now, this is expected to be a limited run, in production for just one year only.  Golden Beryl is slated to hit store shelves in April provided the pandemic doesn’t intervene to delay the launch.

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Review: M600 Tortoiseshell Red (2020)

Pelikan M600 and K600 Tortoiseshell RedTortoiseshell has a long history of use in small items such as combs, glasses, guitar picks, knitting needles, boxes, and even as furniture inlays.  The beauty of the material’s mottled appearance, its durability, and its organic warmth against the skin made tortoiseshell attractive for both manufacturers and consumers.  The time invested to hunt and harvest the tortoises and the care needed in working with the shell to preserve its color made such items rather expensive.  Unfortunately, the quest for profit has resulted in several of those species being hunted to near extinction with many now findings themselves on the endangered species list.  The trade has been banned internationally for some time but that has not deterred harvesting shells for sale within the black market.  Thankfully, more sustainable and environmentally friendly alternatives exist.  The tortoise look is well suited for the likes of fountain pens and fans of Pelikan’s fine writing instruments can’t seem to get enough of such releases.  The company’s tortoise finishes have been captivating people for decades thanks to their refined, upscale look.  I’m happy to report that no actual tortoises have ever been harmed by Pelikan, the characteristic look instead being derived from cellulose acetate crafted to artificially resemble the mottled pattern of true tortoiseshell.  There is no shortage of tortoise variants out there with some of the company’s most iconic and sought after models having been tortoises of one type or another.  The original M800 Tortoiseshell Brown (1989) or the M600 Maruzen Tortoiseshell Brown (1999) come to mind as more recent examples of nearly mythical birds and that is just counting the company’s relatively recent production history to say nothing of the countless historic models such as the 400NN Light Tortoise (1957-60).  To close out 2020, Pelikan has given us the M600 Tortoiseshell Red which looks to be a take on the previously released M101N Tortoiseshell Red (2014), now adapted to the more traditional Souverän line.  Rather than a straight up adaptation however, this new model appears to be a reimagining of sorts.  With a color scheme apropos for a December launch, this one is sure to please with its bold, vibrant hues and unique tortoiseshell application.  Read on to learn if this model stacks up like Theodor Geisel’s Yertle the Turtle, king of the pond in Sala-ma-sond.

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Review: M205 Moonstone (2020)

Pelikan M205 Moonstone Fountain PenAs the year meanders towards its close, I thought it a good time to look back on some of Pelikan’s releases this year.  First up will be the M205 Moonstone fountain pen that accompanied 2020’s Edelstein Ink of the Year of the same name.  It was 2019’s M205 Star Ruby acting as a pathfinder with sparkles adorning its finish that set the stage for the Moonstone.  It represented a departure from Pelikan’s typically reserved German sensibilities and the gamble seems to have paid off as the Star Ruby was generally well received.  I think a large part of that owes to striking just the right balance as the sparkles never came off as overblown and I think that the Moonstone also hits its mark in a similar fashion.  It seems hard to believe but this year’s M205 now counts as the sixth consecutive pen to accompany the annual Edelstein Ink of the Year release.  Prior models have included the M205 Amethyst (2015), M205 Aquamarine (2016), M200 Smoky Quartz (2017), M205 Olivine (2018), and M205 Star Ruby (2019).  All of those models have been demonstrators, the overwhelming majority of which have had silver colored, chromium plated furniture (all except 2017’s Smoky Quartz).  The sparkles are again fitting here because just as they paid homage to the asterism of the star ruby gemstone, they do equal justice with the true moonstone’s adularescence.  What is that you may ask?  The actual gemstone of its namesake displays a blue to white adularescence, a phenomenon where light appears to billow across the surface giving the stone a moonlight-like sheen.  Read on to find out whether or not Pelikan’s reach for the stars hits the mark or falls flat.

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