Alphabet Soup: Pen & Nib Designations

Alphabet Soup

Alphabet Soup

 

Have you ever wondered what the M in front of your beloved M800 stands for?  Do you have a DEF nib on an old Ibis and think to yourself what does that D stand for?  Read on for a quick breakdown of what Pelikan’s letter designations stand for as gathered from various sources.  Of course, I strived to make sure the following list is as factual as possible but there is always room for error, especially since I have no understanding of the German language.  If you do see an error, please feel free to let me know so that I can make the appropriate correction.  Many of these terms can also be found in the glossary.

 

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M481

The M481 is an export version of the M200.  It is the same size  as the M200 but has several interesting differences in trim detail.  The pen was produced from around 1983 – 1985.   It should have styling similar to the Pre-’97 M200 which would include a derby cap top, gold colored trim, absence of a trim ring on the barrel, and two cap bands.  Instead, the M481 has a derby cap top that has no logo design (it is smooth), gold colored trim, absence of  a trim ring on the barrel, and a single cap band.  If you unscrew the derby cap top, you will often (but not always) find the Pelikan logo branded beneath.  These came in black, green-black, burgundy, and clear demonstrator color variations.  The clear demonstrator was not labeled as an M481 but rather listed as “Pelikan Demonstrator.”  Though it does not officially carry the name, it has the same trim as the other pens in the line.  Interestingly, several examples have employed the experimental and short-lived friction fit feed.  Also of note, despite being from the early to mid-1980s, some pens will have “Pelikan Germany” imprinted on the cap band while others will have “Pelikan W.-Germany.”  The nibs are gold-plated stainless steel and were originally available in EF, F, M, B, BB, OM, OB, and OBB.  Pelikan Milano was known to provide a special edition to companies which was not available for sale to the general public (sometimes labeled as an M150).  That M481 is distinguished by a 12C two toned gold nib.

Pelikan brochure featuring the M481 (Japan).

Pelikan brochure featuring the M481 (Japan)

 

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
5.00 in
3.23 in
2.28 in
5.87 in
0.46 in
0.49 oz 

 

Barrel Color

Cap Color

Black (1983)
Black 
Green-Black (1983)
Black 
Burgundy (1983)
Burgundy
Clear Demonstrator (1983)
Clear Demonstrator

Untitled-2*A special edition is known to exist for the Italian Market, produced by Pelikan Milano.  Labeled an M150, it is a black M481 with a 12C monotone gold nib.  This was given as a corporate gift and not available for sale to the general public.  One known example was made for the Lagostina cookware company.  The cap of that pen bears the company logo depicted to the right.

Pelikan M481 Black Pre-'97 Capped

Black

Pelikan M481 Black Pre-'97 Posted

 

Pelikan M481 Green Pre-'97 Capped

Green-Black

Pelikan M481 Green Pre-'97 Posted

 

Pelikan M481 Burgundy Pre-'97 Capped

Burgundy

Pelikan M481 Burgundy Pre-'97 Posted

 

Pelikan M481 Clear Demonstrator Pre-'97 Capped

Clear Demonstrator

Pelikan M481 Clear Demonstrator Pre-'97 Posted

 

Pelikan M481 cap tops circa 1983

Left: Cap top without logo. Right: Hidden logo seen when cap top is removed

M481 cap tops without the Pelikan logo

M481 cap tops without the Pelikan logo

Pen Cases

Pelikan has released several different types of pen cases over the years.  These are generally well constructed and serve their purpose without issue.  The multi-pen cases include a divider which helps keep the pens separated and they will accommodate pens at least as large as the M800.  There have been many variations over the years and below is only a small depiction of what is and has been available.

 

Pen Cases

TG11 & TG12 (1 pen)

Pelikan TG11 Leather Pen CasePelikan TG12 Leather Pen Case

 

TG21 & TG22 (2 pen)

Pelikan TG21 Leather Pen Case Pelikan TG22 Leather Pen Case

 

TG31 & TG32 (3 pen)

Pelikan TG31 Leather Pen Case Pelikan TG32 Leather Pen Case

 

*A TG41 four pen case did exist but is no longer in production.  Older versions of these cases had a gold medallion logo in place of today’s embossed logo.

 

TG180

Pelikan TG180 Red Leather Pen Case

TG181

Pelikan TG181 Green Leather Pen CaseTG182

Pelikan TG182 Yellow Leather Pen Case

TG183

Pelikan TG183 Black Leather Pen Case

TG184

Pelikan TG184 Blue Leather Pen Case

Pelikan Brand Inks

Below, you will find a complete listing of the inks currently available from Pelikan.  In the future, this page will be updated to include swabs and links to reviews.

 

Pelikan 4001

Pelikan’s standard line of inks.  Also available in cartridge form (large & short standard international format).

  • Brilliant Black

  • Royal Blue

  • Blue-Black (not available in the USA)

  • Brilliant Brown

  • Brilliant Green

  • Violet

  • Brilliant Red

  • Turquoise

  • Dark Green

  • Pink (cartridge format only)

 

Pelikan 4001 Brilliant Black Ink

Brilliant Black

Pelikan 4001 Royal Blue Ink

Royal Blue

Pelikan 4001 Blue-Black Ink

Blue-Black

Pelikan 4001 Brilliant Brown Ink

Brilliant Brown

Pelikan 4001 Brilliant Green Ink

Brilliant Green

Pelikan 4001 Violet Ink

Violet

Pelikan 4001 Brilliant Red Ink

Brilliant Red

Pelikan 4001 Turquoise Ink

Turquoise

 

 

Pelikan 4001 Dark Green Ink

Dark Green

Pelikan 4001 Pink Ink

Pink

 


 

M205 DUO Highlighter Ink

Highlighter ink especially formulated for the M205 DUO.  Pelikan recommends not using this ink in pens other than a DUO.

  • Yellow

  • Green

 

Pelikan M205 Duo Yellow Highlighter Ink

Yellow Highlighter

Pelikan M205 Duo Green Highlighter Ink

Green Highlighter

 

 


 

Pelikan Edelstein

Pronounced EY-dell-shtein, this is a newer luxury ink that comes in sculpted bottles with colors that emulate gemstones.  Formulated for smooth flow, all of the available colors are suitable for fountain pen use.  Also available in cartridge form (large & short standard international format).

  • Onyx (Black)

  • Tanzanite (Blue-Black)

  • Aventurine (Green)

  • Jade (Light Green)

  • Mandarin (Orange)

  • Ruby (Red)

  • Sapphire (Blue)

  • Topaz (Purple-Blue)

  • Turmaline (Plum) – Ink of the Year 2012

  • Amber (Amber) – Ink of the Year 2013

  • Garnet (Dark Red) – Ink of the Year 2014

  • Amethyst (Purple) – Ink of the Year 2015

  • Aquamarine (Blue-Green) – Ink of the Year 2016

  • Smoky Quartz (Brown) – Ink of the Year 2017

  • Olivine (Olive-Green) – Ink of the Year 2018

  • Star Ruby (Burgundy-Pink) – Ink of the Year 2019

 

Pelikan Edelstein Onyx Ink

Onyx

Pelikan Edelstein Tanzanite Ink

Tanzanite

Pelikan Edelstein Aventurine Ink

Aventurine

Pelikan Edelstein Jade Ink

Jade

 

Pelikan Edelstein Mandarin Ink

Mandarin

Pelikan Edelstein Ruby Ink

Ruby

Pelikan Edelstein Turmaline Ink

Turmaline

Pelikan Edelstein Sapphire Ink

Sapphire

Pelikan Edelstein Topaz Ink

Topaz

Pelikan Edelstein Amber Ink

Amber

Pelikan Edelstein Garnet Ink

Garnet

 

Pelikan Edelstein Amethyst Ink

Amethyst

Pelikan Edelstein Aquamarine Ink

Aquamarine

 

Edelstein Smoky Quartz

Smoky Quartz

Edelstein Olivine

Olivine

 

Edelstein Star Ruby

Star Ruby

 

 


Pelikan Fount India

An Indian Ink style drawing ink for use in fountain pens.  Reported to offer waterproof and lightfast properties.  It is strongly recommended that the pen be flushed after use so as to prevent drying of the ink in the feed.

  • Black

 

221143_102010_fount_india_fllhaltertusche_2_5270

Black

Accessories & Ephemera

Below you will find links to pages dedicated to various Pelikan accessories that I have come across, including but not limited to Pelikan pen stands and cases as well as any other notable ephemera.

 

Pen Stands

Pelikan Gold Pen Stand Pelikan Silver Pen Stand Pelikan Blue Pen Stand Pelikan White Pen Stand

 

 

Pen Cases

Pelikan Single Pen Case Pelikan Two Pen Case Pelikan Three Pen Case

 

Miscellaneous

Pelikan Traveling Lap Desk

Frequently Asked Questions

 

1. How do I fill a Pelikan fountain pen?
2. What filling systems are available in Pelikan fountain pens?
3. Where can I send my pen to be repaired?
4. How old is my pen?
5. How do I clean my fountain pen?
6. How do I remove the nib of my fountain pen?
7. How much ink does my fountain pen hold?
8. What materials are my fountain pen made from?
9. Which nibs are compatible with my pen?
10. Do I have to watch out for counterfeit Pelikan pens?
11. What if the polystyrene collar on my nib/feed is cracked?
12. Is it safe to fly with a Pelikan fountain pen?
13. Should I save the box and paperwork that came with my pen?
14. I just bought a new pen, how do I exchange the nib?
15. Can I use the M205 DUO highlighter ink on top of other fountain pen ink?
16. Help me identify this Pelikan?
17. What inks are safe for my Pelikan pen?
18. How can I tell if the tines on my nib are misaligned?
19. What is the best way to remove a vintage Pelikan nib and feed?
20. What is a frankenpen?
21. I’m going to my first pen show! What can I expect?
22. Where can I get Pelikan 4001 Blue-Black in the USA?
23. How do I remove the piston assembly from my pen?
24. Should I flush my pen before changing inks?
25. I just bought a used Pelikan. What do I have to watch out for?
26. Do Pelikan’s model numbers tell you anything about the pen?
27. How should I prepare my pen for shipping?
28. Who or what is a nib meister?
29. Are all M series pens part of the Souveran series?

 


 

How do I fill a Pelikan fountain pen?

Pelikan pens are easy to fill.  You simply remove the cap and immerse the nib into the ink of your choice.  You only need to immerse the pen up to the beginning of the section.  Work the piston knob to advance the piston until it won’t go any further (do not force past this point).  Next, return the knob to it’s seated position.  This will draw ink into the reservoir.  Repeat the process if the first attempt does not result in a full fill (I usually do it twice as a standing practice to get the best fill but this is not always necessary).

What filling systems are available in Pelikan fountain pens?

Pelikan fountain pens began as piston fillers and that design is at the core of their roots.  All Souverän series pens are piston fillers.  Over the years, Pelikan has introduced many cartridge pens as well, usually compatible with the long international cartridge standard.  The tradition line has always been piston driven until 2014 when Pelikan introduced the P200/P205.  In short, any pen model preceded by an ‘M’ should be a piston filler and any pen with a ‘P’ should be a cartridge/converter pen.

Where can I send my pen to be repaired?

Warranty repairs or repairs by an official representative of Pelikan are carried out by Chartpak in the USA and by Pelikan themselves elsewhere.  Chartpak only repairs pens purchased within the United States, otherwise, items have to be shipped to Germany.  Pelikan can be contacted for repairs via this form.  Chartpak can be found here.

Pelikan:

Pelikan Vertriebsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG
Werftstraße 9
30163 Hanover
Germany
Tel.: +49 (0)511 6969-0, Fax: +49 (0)511 6969-212

Chartpak:

Chartpak, Inc.
One River Road
Leeds, MA 01053

Tele: (413) 584-5446 or (800) 628-1910, x240
Fax: (413) 587-0499 (ATTN: Pen Repair/Abi)
Email: penrepair@chartpak.com

How old is my pen?

It seems enthusiast always want to know the provenance of their pens.  There have been several changes/conventions over time that allow for an approximate dating of Pelikan fountain pens.  See HERE for a timeline of pen introduction dates and HERE for a discussion about dating a pen.

How do I clean my fountain pen?

A Pelikan piston filling pen is very easy to clean and there are a few methods that you can employ.  One way is to take a cup of cool water (not hot or cold) and run the piston up and down flushing ink from the reservoir and feed.  You should exchange the dirty water for fresh water periodically and continue until the water runs clear.  I favor this method for vintage pens that I’m leery of removing the nib from.  If there is no contraindication to removing the nib, I will remove the nib and run the section under the faucet until the water runs clear.  Next, I will run the nib and feed under the water.  This method gets the job done more quickly and easily.  If I have a concern for old/dried ink clogging the feed, I will cycle the piston a few times in an ammonia solution.  I use pre-made J.B.’s Pen Flush which is widely available but this can also be accomplished with a 10% solution that you make yourself.  Simply mix 1 part ammonia to 9 parts water.  Remember to flush the pen with water after the ammonia to prevent problems in the future.

It also is often asked whether a pen needs to be flushed before a first fill and there is debate on both sides of this issue.  I do not personally and have not had any trouble but many people do.  Because oils and grit can be retained from the manufacturing process which will impair ink flow, several people have had success utilizing a mixture of water and a minuscule amount of Dawn dish detergent to breakdown and remove these oils.  The pen should then be flushed with plain water afterwards to remove the soap residue.

How do I remove the nib of my fountain pen?

One of the great things about Pelikan pens is the ability for the user to be able to swap and replace nibs.  In a modern pen, this is simply accomplished by grasping the feed and nib between the thumb and forefinger and gently turning counter-clockwise.  If the nib does not want to unscrew, it can be because of built up dried ink which will act like cement.  In that case, soak the nib and section in water and repeat.  Several soakings may be required.  I would discourage the use of applied heat (can warp the barrel) or prolonged exposure to an ultrasonic cleaner (can mar finishes).  Please see this link for a How-To article.

How much ink does my fountain pen hold?

There can be a lot of variability amongst differing methods of ascertaining ink volume as well as variability between the people making the measurement.  Below are common values reported in terms of ink capacity for a variety of models.  For reference, a short international cartridge holds 0.75ml and a large holds 1.50ml.

Model
Ink Capacity (ml)*
Ink Capacity (ml)**
400
1.97
_
M2xx
1.29
1.20
M3xx
_
0.65
M4xx
1.29
1.30
M6xx
1.37
1.30
M8xx
1.37
1.35
M10xx
1.97
1.35

*As determined by Francis Goossens (fountainbel) based on measuring piston bore/stroke.

**As reported by Pelikan in their official catalogs from 2013 & 2014.

What materials are my fountain pen made from?

Modern Pelikan pens of the Souverän series are generally made of resin for the body and cap with the striped or marbling effect being accomplished with cellulose acetate.

Which nibs are compatible with my pen?

This will be the topic of a future post.  For now I will refer you to the excellent chart hosted by Richard Binder.  This nib interchangeability chart can be found at the bottom of his site’s section on Pelikan pens.

Do I have to watch out for counterfeit Pelikan pens?

If one is familiar with fountain pens, it quickly becomes apparent that certain high end brands lend themselves to counterfeiting.  The range of fakes can be anywhere from obvious to incredibly subtle.  While this has plagued certain other high end manufacturers, it has not been an issue with Pelikans.  I have seen thousands of Pelikans on the used market and have never come across anything that I would deem to be a fake.  That doesn’t excluded the possibility of there being counterfeit pens but I would buy with confidence at this point in time as the likelihood of finding a fake is very small.

What if the polystyrene collar on my nib/feed is cracked?

It is my understanding that Pelikan in Germany will replace these for a nominal fee.  If you don’t want to send your pen in for repairs and are interested in fixing this yourself, it is relatively simple to do if you’re part adventurous and mostly careful.  Richard Binder hosts an excellent tutorial on his site that I will refer you to.

Is it safe to fly with a Pelikan fountain pen?

Pelikans do very well with air travel in my experience.  While individual results will vary and also be somewhat dependent on the ink in question, there is minimal burping of ink from the feed.  Steps to minimize issues would be storing the pen nib up during take-off and landing as well as leaving a small amount of air in the ink reservoir to allow for expansion.

Should I save the box and paperwork that came with my pen?

While it is a personal decision to save such things as the box and paperwork, I would encourage anyone to do so.  While you may have no intention of ever selling the pen now, should you choose to do so in the future, you will more than likely get more out of it in resale as collectors such as myself put a premium on those extras.

I just bought a new pen, how do I exchange the nib?

Pelikan will allow you to exchange the nib on a newly purchased pen within the first four weeks of purchase, free of charge.  Pelikan recommends that you contact your authorized retailer for an exchange or send the pen into the local Pelikan distributor.

Can I use the M205 DUO highlighter ink on top of other fountain pen ink?

Both of the available highlighter inks from Pelikan have been shown to dissolve other non-permanent inks to the point of illegibility.  Different inks react differently but the result is almost always unsatisfactory.  I would recommend that the highlighter inks be used for underlining and notation only of other fountain pen inks and that highlighting be reserved for printed text.

Help me identify this Pelikan?

Many Pelikans that are sold are incorrectly identified, leading to confusion.  Have a look through the pictures and descriptions of the various models listed in The Aviary to better identify your pen.  If questions still persist, feel free to contact me via the contact form.

What inks are safe for my Pelikan pen?

I find there to be very few absolutes with regards to ink do’s and don’ts.  Common sense often prevails.  Pelikans are not usually damaged by inks (unlike pens with sacs) outside of potential staining.  Highly saturated inks are more likely to stain a pen, especially demonstrators.  Inks with red dyes such as red, brown, and purple have all been implicated in staining in the past but this is often manufacturer specific.  Often times, good pen maintenance can thwart staining, even from a  highly saturated ink.  Certain permanent or bullet-proof inks can also cause problems with staining.  Finally, iron gall inks should be avoided as these are very prone to clog a feed.  If you use Pelikan’s Fount India, you should perform regular pen hygiene and flush after use.

How can I tell if the tines on my nib are misaligned?

Many nibs across multiple brands don’t work well right out of the box.  There are multiple reasons for this but the end result is usually a less than satisfactory writing experience.  Misaligned tines can cause hard starts and scratchy writing.  To check tine alignment, you need a good 10x loupe.  The naked eye is usually not able to visualize subtle misalignments and should not be relied upon.  Anyone who enjoys fountain pens is well served by investing in a relatively inexpensive loupe.

What is the best way to remove a vintage Pelikan nib and feed?

The process is similar to what I described above for the modern nibs but when it comes to vintage nibs, damage can easily occur if you’re not careful.  Over time, the longitudinal ebonite feeds become weak and fragile.  Pelikan themselves had a special tool for removing them.  There is also a high likelihood of dried ink cementing the nib into the section.  Repeated soakings of the nib, feed, and section can be helpful in freeing up old ink.  I favor protecting the fins of the feed as best as possible by wrapping them in a tissue, placing the nib in the crook of my finger, and turning the barrel, not the nib.  Please see this link for a How-To article.

What is a frankenpen?

A frankenpen is a term applied to a pen that is a mis-match of parts from multiple pens.  For example, an M400 cap applied to an old style M600 body.  These mis-matches are usually not factory and occurred sometime after purchase.

I’m going to my first pen show! What can I expect?

Attending your first pen show is very exciting and just a little bit overwhelming.  Some tips to keep in mind would be to dress comfortably and definitely wear comfortable shoes.  If you intend to make a purchase, it is always advisable to bring cash.  Walk through the show in its entirety before negotiating any prices.  A better deal could be on the next table over.  It helps if you have an idea in mind of what you might be in the market for before going or else it can get very overwhelming.  If you want to employ the services of a nib meister, get there early and get your name on their list.  Each will have a list which can fill up quite quickly.  Check back regularly as someone might not show up allowing you to move into their slot.  I always find it better to be respectful and ask before you handle a vendor’s pens.  You often won’t see all the vendors of a show set up on Friday.  Friday is more of a low key day which allows for great conversation with the vendors who do make it in.  If you only have one day to go though, pick Saturday or Sunday.  Most of all, relax and have fun!  You can find a write-up that I did with some further suggestions in this post.

Where can I get Pelikan 4001 Blue-Black in the USA?

Unfortunately, you can’t.  A chemical inside of this particular ink, while not toxic, does not meet the regulatory requirements of the U.S.A.  Since the formulation is legal in most of the rest of the world however, it is sold overseas and there is no large impetus to change the formulation.  It can be ordered from overseas vendors and delivered to the U.S.A.  I have had success through Amazon.com but there are many other vendors willing to ship to the U.S. as well.

How do I remove the piston assembly from my pen?

You don’t.  Many people talk about removing the piston assembly and this is rarely necessary and almost never for a casual user.  The M2xx, M3xx, M4xx, and M6xx are press-fit piston assemblies and even a single attempt at removal can damage the injection molded plastic that holds the assembly in place, necessitating possibly having to shellac the piston back into place.  The M101N, M8xx, M1xxx and a few other outliers have a threaded assembly (reverse threaded) and so can be unscrewed more safely.  Essentially though, anything that would require removal of the piston assembly is likely best done by a repair professional.  It is absolutely 100% unnecessary to remove the piston assembly to apply silicone as this can be done from the section after unscrewing the nib.

Should I flush my pen before changing inks?

It is good practice to always flush a pen (cool water) before changing ink colors and especially before changing brands of ink.  Many inks can react with one another resulting in unexpected and undesired outcomes.  If you are refilling with the same brand & color, a flush is likely unnecessary.  If you change colors within the same brand, not flushing will, at the least, cause a muddying of the new color since there will still be a good amount of ink in the feed.

I just bought a used Pelikan. What do I have to watch out for?

Congratulations!  Pelikan pens are very durable which is one of the reasons they are so appealing and a great bargain on the used market.  There are a few things to watch out for though.  If the piston knob won’t turn, don’t force it.  This can be due to a lack of lubrication or dried ink seizing the piston.  Try to unscrew the nib and fill the barrel with water and let it sit for a bit.  Silicone grease can be utilized without disassembling the pen to help improve the ease of the piston’s travel.  See the tutorial HERE.  Next, if there is ink leaking from the piston knob, it can indicate a failed piston seal which more than likely will need replacing and you should seek out a repair professional.  Be gentle with nib removal at first as described above so as not to cause any damage.  If the piston functions and the pen draws ink/water, you should be good to go.  The only other thing I would recommend is a good soak and flush of the nib to expel any old ink which might end up giving you flow problems.

Do Pelikan’s model numbers tell you anything about the pen?

They sure do, if you know the code.  Regarding the tradition and Souverän lines, The ‘M’ indicates a piston filler and a ‘P’ indicates a cartridge/converter pen.  The first number is the series number (1xx, 2xx, 3xx, 4xx, 5xx, 6xx, 8xx, or 10xx).  This denotes models of roughly the same size and style.  All pens ending in ‘0’ denote a standard model with gold trim and ‘5’ indicates a standard model with rhodium trim.  When the second digit is a ‘2,’ ‘3,’ or ‘4,’ it indicate a special edition release with some sterling silver component.  When the second digit is a ‘5,’ this generally refers to a vermeil edition with the exception of the M250.

How should I prepare my pen for shipping?

If you ever find yourself having to ship a pen, either as part of a sale or for repair, there are a few things you should do.  First, always empty the pen completely of any ink.  Never ship an inked pen as that can become very messy when the ink inevitably spills.  Next, package it securely.  It helps if you have a rigid container to house the pen for added protection against crushing.  Old cigar tubes and cut PVC pipe work very well for this.  Finally, send the package via a tracked and insured method whenever possible.  While not mandatory, it does provide significant piece of mind.

Who or what is a nib meister?

A nib meister is a pen specialist who is well equipped to deal with any issues or customizations that one may need performed on a nib.  Many also do pen repairs.  A nib meister can fix skipping, hard starts, or excessive feedback from a nib for example.  There are also customizations that can be performed such as increasing/decreasing flow, adding flex, re-tipping, or grinding the nib to make a specialty nib such as a stub or italic.  The services of just a few nib meisters can be found HERE.

Are all M series pens part of the Souverän series?

No.  The Souverän (Sovereign) series is Pelikan’s premium line and is equivalent in concept to Montblanc’s Meisterstück line.  It was introduced in 1982 with the re-introduction of the M400.  The Souverän line is comprised of the M3xx, M4xx, M6xx, M8xx, and M10xx.  The M1xx and M2xx pens are part of the tradition or classical series which has historically been Pelikan’s lower tierd lines.

Glossary of Terms

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 

A

Ambering

The result of an oxidative reaction that results in a yellow-brown discoloration of certain plastics over time.

B

Barrel

The body of the pen that usually houses the filling mechanism and reservoir.

Binde

A German word that describes the colored/patterned sleeve that is fitted around the outside of the barrel of a vintage Pelikan fountain pen.  Pronounced BIN-duh.

Brassing

Refers to the wear of a filled or plated surface that results in the base metal (often brass) showing through.

Breather Hole

A small hole found at the base of the split in the tines of the nib.  Its purpose is to provide a smoother ink flow.

C

Cap

A cover to protect the nib and help prevent the ink from drying while the pen is not in use.  These can be snap or screw type.

Cap Band

An ornate piece of metal found at the base of a cap to provide decoration and help prevent cracking of the material at the lip.

Cap Top

The end of the cap opposite of the lip.  This is the area that often bears the Pelikan logo and is used to affix the clip.

Cartridge

A disposable, pre-filled plastic ink reservoir used in pens that accept cartridges.  Available in various sizes that are manufacturer specific.

Cartridge/Converter

A type of pen that can utilize a disposable ink cartridge or a re-usable converter which pulls ink from a bottle.

Chased

A type of finish that consist of repeated geometric patterns.

Clip

A piece of metal attached to the cap that prevents the pen from rolling as well as allowing attachment to a piece of paper or shirt pocket.

Converter

A re-usable/replaceable ink reservoir that is used in cartridge/converter pens to allows drawing ink up from a bottle.

Cork

A type of material used for piston seals in early, pre-war Pelikan pens.  These are prone to rotting over time and it is recommended that they be kept moist for optimal function.

D

Demonstrator

The modern term indicates a pen whose internal mechanism and ink reservoir is visible through a clear or colored plastic.  Historically, these were non-working salesman’s models that had cutouts to show the mechanism of the pen.

Desk Pen

A pen with a long, tapered end to help achieve a good balance/appearance for use as part of a desk set.

Desk Set

A set containing one or more pens with a base to hold those pens.

Druckbleistift

German for a propelling, mechanical pencil.  The derivation of Pelikan’s Dxxx designation.

Durchschreib

The designation for Pelikan’s manifold nibs which are very firm and inflexible to facilitate writing on carbon copies.

E

Ebonite

A hard rubber material employed in vintage pens for feeds and other parts.  Because of the nature of the material, it can become brittle with age.

F

Feed

The material upon which the nib sits that facilitates ink traveling from the reservoir to the tip of the nib.  Usually with multiple fins to increase surface area and allow for capillary action.

Flexible

A description of a nib’s ability to bend and provide variation in line width.  Mostly seen on vintage pens and can range from semi-flex, to flex, to wet noodle.  Modern pens, unless specifically designed with flex in mind, are often firm.  Over flexing a nib can be damaging resulting in a sprung nib.

Friction Fit

A type of nib fitting that was experimented with by Pelikan.  The nib and feed were seated in the section by friction, rather than a threaded collar.

Füllfederhalter

German for fountain pen.

Furniture

A reference to the external metal parts of a pen, also known as the trim.  This would include cap bands, clips, and trim rings.

G

Gold Filled

A technique which places gold on top of a base metal, usually brass.

Graphos

A system of interchangeable nibs with a nib holder designed by Pelikan and used from the 1930’s – 1950’s for technical drawing and calligraphy.

H

Hard Rubber

A material employed in early pen feeds and bodies popular in the early part of the twentieth century.  Can become fragile over time and prone to wear more so than modern materials.

Hooded

A design that covers a portion of the nib with a sleeve of plastic or hood to help protect against drying out as well as to provide some protection.

I

Ink Window

A window which allows the level or remaining ink in the pen to be gauged.

Inner Cap

A liner inside of a cap designed to help prevent a pen from drying out when capped.  Vintage Pelikan liners were made of metal which did not shrink over time when the surrounding plastic did resulting in cracking of the caps.

Irridium

A tipping material related to platinum employed for its hardness and wear resistance.

Italic

A type of nib that is available in varying widths to provide line variations.  Usually custom produced and available in a variety of styles from crisp to stub.

J

K

Karat

A reference to the gold alloy employed in nib manufacturing.  Often seen listed as K or C.  i.e. 10K-417, 12K-500, 14K-585, and 18K-750.  The trailing number after the karat weight is a European reference to actual gold content (41.7%, 50%, 58.5%, and 75%).  24K describes pure gold which is not employed in nibs due to its softness.

Knockout Block

A piece of wood or metal that is used to separate a nib from a feed.

Kugel

German for ball and used to refer to a type of nib designated as a Kugel or Ball nib.  These nibs have rounded tipping to facilitate easy writing from multiple angles.

Kugelschreiber

German for ballpoint pen.  The derivation of Pelikan’s Kxxx designation.

L

Limited Edition

A run of pens that are of a limited quantity, sometimes numbered, sometimes not.

M

Maki-e

A Japanese technique of pen decoration that applies gold power to a lacquered service.  A very delicate and time consuming technique, often resulting in pens of higher value.  Pronounced mah-kee-eh.

Manifold

A very rigid nib used to make an impression on a carbon copy.

Mechanik-Füller or Mechanik-Federhalter

German for mechanical or piston fountain pen.  The derivation of Pelikan’s Mxxx designation.

N

New Old Stock

A pen that is currently out of production but was not previously sold at retail and therefore is still available new.  Abbreviated as NOS.

Nib

The writing point of the pen made of various materials usually consisting of two split tines and a tipping material.

Nib Creep

Accumulation of ink on a nib which can range from mild to severe.  Often related to the properties of the ink being used.

O

Oblique

Available in left and right footed designs to facilitate an individuals’ rotation of the pen.

P

Patronen-Füellhalter

German for a cartridge fountain pen.  The derivation of Pelikan’s Pxxx designation.

Piston

A filling system with a screw driven piston that facilities taking ink up from a bottle.

Piston Knob

The knob, usually at the base of the barrel that actuates the piston mechanism.

Piston Seal

The seal at the end of the piston mechanism that provides suction to draw up ink but also prevent ink from leaking behind the piston mechanism.  These are made of synthetics in modern pens but original pens utilized cork which can require special maintenance.

Polystyrene

An injection molded plastic employed in some older Pelikan collars.  Due to the nature of the material, it becomes very fragile and crumbles over time resulting in ink leakage, requiring replacement.

Posting

Placing the pen’s cap at the end of the barrel opposite the nib while writing to keep it secure and also to facilitate a better hand feel and balance in certain pen models.

Q

R

Reservoir

The portion of the barrel that contains the ink.

Rhodium

A silver colored metal of the platinum family used in the plating of nibs and furniture.  Notable for it’s properties of resisting oxidation.

Rolled Gold

A technique employing sheets of rolled gold to plate materials.  It is not as durable as gold-fill.

Rollerball

A rollerball pen that employs a type of ink in a sealed cartridge system.  Pelikan designates their rollerball line as Rxxx.

S

Section

The end of the barrel that the nib is fitted into.  Usually contains the threads onto which the cap screws.

Silvexa

Pelikan’s trade name for the matte finish of the cap of a line of pens that were available in both piston filled and cartridge variants.

Slit

The areas of the nib that facilities the capillary action and drawing of ink from the feed to the writing surface.

Souverän

A German word for sovereign and denotes the Pelikan brand’s line of luxury pens.

Spring

A property of nibs that does not refer to flex but rather a softness to the writing experience.

Sprung Nib

A nib that has been over-flexed and therefore damaged, often beyond repair.

Stainless Steel

A material employed in lower tier pen nibs.  Usually without flex but can have some spring.  Often plated in gold.

Stresemann

A description of Pelikan’s classic pinstripe appearance with green and black stripes.  It is the Souverän series nickname derived from the Secretary of State of the Weimar Republic well-known for wearing striped trousers.  The foreign minister of the Weimar Republic, Gustav Stresemann (1879- 1929), was honored with the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1926.  Together with his French colleague Aristide Briand, he was acknowleged for his reconciliatory work between the nations after World War I. Besides his impressive political career, Stresemann also became famous for the creation of a new kind of suit that was still sufficiently formal for official presentations and yet comfortable enough for his work at the office. Stresemann liked to wear suits with thin stripes and suddenly people started calling the striped fountain pens from Pelikan, which were just then starting their global tour around the world, by the name of “Stresemann.”

Stub

A nib shape that is utilized to provide line variation similar to that of an italic but is more rounded and therefore easy to use.

T

Trim

A reference to the external metal parts of a pen, also known as the furniture.  This would include cap bands, clips, and trim rings.

Two-Tone Nib

A nib that is partially plated, usually with rhodium, for decorative effect.

U

V

Vermeil

A thin layer of very pure gold bonded to silver.

W

Wet Noodle

A nib that has extreme flexibility, able to produce maximal line variation.

Wet Writer

Often used to describe Pelikan nibs.  This is a reference to the nib producing a generous, wet line.

X

Y

Z

Fountain Pens

Below you will find ‘Quick Links’ to a detailed accounting of all of the known variations of the Pelikan M75, M1xx, M2xx, P2xx, M3xx, and M6xx families of fountain pens including the M481 and M101N.  Links include detailed lists, descriptions, and pictures of many of the documented pens.  Below the Quick Links a brief description, including the dimensions of each pen, is available for easy reference.  Clicking on any heading will also take you to that model’s respective page.  The M75-M250 range has been the particular focus of my collecting.  In time, I expect to add other pages dedicated to various other Pelikan models.

 Quick Links
M75 Go!
M100
M150
M200
M205
M215
M250
P200
P205
M481
M300
M320
M350
M600
M605
M620
M625
M630
M640
M650 
M101N
     

 

M75 Go!

The M75 Go! was introduced in November 1992 by Pelikan as an economy fountain pen for youth but it is now discontinued.  They are larger pens with interesting turquoise or maroon trim.  Despite it’s somewhat odd appearance, these are well regarded writers for the most part.  There is also a similarly styled P71 Go! which was identical externally except for an extra colored “gill” but differed in that it was a cartridge pen.  The nibs of these pens are gold plated stainless steel.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
5.43 in
4.29 in
2.40 in
6.30 in 
0.47 in
0.60 oz 

 

M100

The M100 was initially released in 1985, likely the black variant first followed by several colored models.  They are distinguished by the derby cap top and rhodium colored trim.  The exception to that rule is the white model that has its trim painted black.  The cap band and lip are beveled and there is no trim ring on the barrel.  These were discontinued before 1997 and therefore there is only one style of trim for this model.  This model shares similar styling as the MC110 calligraphy pen.  The nibs of these pens are stainless steel.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
4.72 in
3.23 in
2.13 in
5.71 in
0.43 in
0.39 oz 

 

M150

The M150 was initially released in 1985, likely the black variant first followed by several colored models.  These pens are the same size as the M100 and the two are often mistaken for each other.  The easy way to tell the difference is that the M100 has rhodium trim and the M150 has gold trim.  There are two trim variants of M150, depending on the year of release.  Pelikan restyled their trim levels in 1997 resulting in pre-’97 and post-’97 trim variations.  The pre-’97 pens are distinguished by a derby cap top, gold colored trim, absence of a trim ring on the barrel, and the cap band and lip are beveled.  The post-’97 pens have a crown cap top, gold colored trim, trim ring at the piston knob, and the cap band is no longer beveled.  These pens are styled similarly to the MC120 calligraphy pen.  The nibs of these pens are gold plated stainless steel.  It should be noted that the post-’97 M150 trim variant with green barrel and black cap has been sold in the Italian market under the model name M151.

Trim
Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
Pre-’97
4.72 in
3.23 in
2.13 in
5.71 in 
0.43 in
0.39 oz 
Post-’97
 4.72 in
3.23 in 
2.13 in 
5.71 in
0.43 in 
0.39 oz 

 

M200

The M200 was initially released in 1985, likely the black variant first followed by several colored models.  These pens are the same size as the M400 which was reintroduced three years prior, in 1982.  There are two trim variants of M200, depending on the year of release.  Pelikan restyled their trim levels in 1997 resulting in pre-’97 and post-’97 trim variations.  The pre-’97 pens are distinguished by a derby cap top, gold colored trim, absence of a trim ring on the barrel, and two cap bands.  The only exception to the pre-’97 two cap band rule is the tortoiseshell brown and type II & III clear demonstrators which are pre-’97 pens that only have one cap band.  The post-’97 pens have a crown cap top, gold colored trim, trim ring at the piston knob, and a single cap band.  The nibs of these pens are gold plated stainless steel.  1.20ml ink capacity.

Trim
Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
Pre-’97
5.00 in
3.23 in
2.28 in
5.87 in
0.46 in
0.49 oz
Post-’97
4.92 in
3.23 in
2.20 in
5.71 in
0.46 in
0.49 oz

 

M205

The M205 was released in the early 2000’s as demonstrator variants followed by the black, red, and white models in 2009.  These pens are the also the same size as the M200/400.  There is only one trim variant of the M205 since it was released after the 1997 trim change.  These pens are distinguished from the M200 because of their rhodium trim and different color patterns.  The M205 pens have a crown cap top, rhodium colored trim, trim ring at the piston knob, and a single cap band.  The nibs of these pens are stainless steel.  1.20ml ink capacity.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
4.92 in
3.23 in
2.20 in
5.71 in
0.46 in
0.49 oz

 

M215

The M215 was initially released in 2005 as the now hard to find blue barrel with stripes pattern.  This was followed by the rings, lozenges, and orthogons.  These pens are the same size as the M200/400 but are distinguished by their increased weight due to a metal barrel construction.  The M2xx series of pens are generally 0.46 ounces whereas the M215 is 0.74 ounces.  These pens are also distinguished by their rhodium colored trim and inlay on the barrel.  There is only one trim variation as the  model was released after the 1997 restyling.  The M215 pens have a crown cap top, rhodium colored trim, trim ring at the piston knob, and a single cap band.  The nibs of these pens are stainless steel.  There is an ink window just above the section which is rather dark in color compared to other Pelikan’s.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
4.92 in
3.23 in
2.20 in
5.71 in
0.46 in
0.74 oz

 

M250

The M250 was initially released in 1985, likely the black variant first followed by several colored models.  These pens are the same size as the M400 which was reintroduced that year as well.  They are distinguished from the M200 by their 14C-585 nibs.  There are two trim variants of M250, depending on the year of release.  Pelikan restyled their trim levels in 1997 resulting in pre-’97 and post-’97 trim variations.  The pre-’97 pens are distinguished by a derby cap top, gold colored trim, absence of a trim ring on the barrel, and two cap bands.  The only exception to the pre-’97 absent trim ring on the barrel is the tortoiseshell brown which has a thicker than usual trim ring at the piston knob, similar to the old style M600’s.  The post-’97 pens have a crown cap top, gold colored trim, trim ring at the piston knob, and a single cap band.  This model line was discontinued in the early 2000’s (circa 2005).  1.20ml ink capacity.

Trim
Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
Pre-’97
5.00 in
3.23 in
2.28 in
5.87 in
0.46 in
0.49 oz
Post-’97
4.92 in
3.23 in
2.20 in
5.71 in 
0.46 in
0.49 oz

 

P200

The P200 cartridge fountain pen was first introduced in 2014. It was released in response to a long-standing request for a pen of classic styling with a cartridge type filling system. As of now, it is only available in black. This is the first cartridge/converter pen in Pelikan’s Classic series. The styling is very similar to the M200. The cap has a single cap band, pelican beak clip, and crown cap top with a one chick painted logo. The cap is identical to the M200 and is actually interchangeable. The barrel has a single trim ring just above the cap threads and is unscrewed from the section to accommodate one long or two short international cartridges as well as Pelikan’s own C499 converter. The nib is gold-plated stainless steel but cannot be swapped with the nibs of the M2xx or M4xx lines. The furniture is 23-ct gold-plated.  1.40ml ink capacity.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
4.92 in
3.23 in
2.20 in
5.79 in
0.48 in
0.42 oz

 

P205

The P205 cartridge fountain pen was first introduced in 2014.  It was released in response to a long-standing request for a pen of classic styling with a cartridge type filling system.  As of now, it is only available in black.  This is the first cartridge/converter pen in Pelikan’s Classic series.  The styling is very similar to the M205.  The cap has a single cap band, pelican beak clip, and crown cap top with a one chick painted logo.  The cap is identical to the M205 and is actually interchangeable.  The barrel has a single trim ring just above the cap threads and is unscrewed from the section to accommodate one long or two short international cartridges as well as Pelikan’s own C499 converter.  The nib is polished stainless steel but cannot be swapped with the nibs of the M2xx or M4xx lines.  The furniture is chromium plated.  1.40ml ink capacity.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
4.92 in
3.23 in
2.20 in
5.79 in
0.48 in
0.42 oz

 

M481

The M481 is an export version of the M200.  It is the same size  as the M200 but has several interesting differences in trim detail.  The pen was produced from around 1983 – 1985.   It should have styling similar to the Pre-’97 M200 which would include a derby cap top, gold colored trim, absence of a trim ring on the barrel, and two cap bands.  Instead, the M481 has a derby cap top that has no logo design (it is smooth), gold colored trim, absence of  a trim ring on the barrel, and a single cap band.  If you unscrew the derby cap top, you will often (but not always) find the Pelikan logo branded beneath.  These came in black, green-black, burgundy, and clear demonstrator color variations.  The clear demonstrator was not labeled as an M481 but rather listed as “Pelikan Demonstrator.”  Though it does not officially carry the name, it has the same trim as the other pens in the line.  Interestingly, several examples have employed the experimental and short-lived friction fit feed.  Also of note, despite being from the early to mid-1980s, some pens will have “Pelikan Germany” imprinted on the cap band while others will have “Pelikan W.-Germany.”  The nibs are gold-plated stainless steel and were originally available in EF, F, M, B, BB, OM, OB, and OBB.  Pelikan Milano was known to provide a special edition to companies which was not available for sale to the general public (sometimes labeled as an M150).  That M481 is distinguished by a 12C two toned gold nib.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
5.00 in
3.23 in
2.28 in
5.87 in
0.46 in
0.49 oz 

 

M300

Originally released in 1998, the M300 fills a unique niche in the Pelikan line-up.  They are the youngest and the smallest of the Souverän line by a fair margin.  Even the M1xx of the Classic series, a smaller pen in its own right, dwarfs the M300.  Since they were released after 1997, there is only one trim style to be found.  There are two variants in the M300 line, both originally released in 1998, the green striped and solid black models.  These pens have a black piston knob, section, and cap.  There are two cap bands, a trim ring at the section, and two trim rings at the piston knob.  The furniture is gold-plated.  The cap top has a painted two chick logo from 1998-2003, a painted one chick logo from 2003-2010, and a 24K plated one chick logo cap top from 2010 to present.  The nib depicts the Pelikan logo and is a two-tone 14C-585 gold.  The nib is user removable like the other Souveräns but, due to its small size the M3xx nib does not swap between other models.   The barrel exhibits transparency on the striated model to allow the ink level to be viewed while there is an ink window to accomplish this on the black model.  0.65ml ink capacity.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
4.33 in
2.68 in
1.93 in
5.12 in
0.39 in
0.37 oz 

 

M320

The M320 was first introduced in 2004 when Pelikan gave us the Orange Marbled variant.  This was followed up with Jade Green in 2007, Ruby Red in 2010, and Pearl in 2011.  These pens maintain the same M3xx form factor but introduce some rather colorful and exotic finishes.  There is only one trim variant.  The pens all have a black piston knob and section except for the Pearl model whose piston knob and section match the coloring of the barrel and cap.  The caps of these pens match their respective finishes.  There are two cap bands, a trim ring at the section, and two trim rings at the piston knob.  The furniture is gold-plated.  The cap top has a painted one chick logo on the Orange Marbled and Jade Green Models.  Since the Ruby Red was released during the year Pelikan transitioned its Souverän line to the 24K plated cap top, you will find examples of both in that model.  The Pearl release is only found with the 24K plated one chick logo cap top.  The nibs of these pens are two-toned 14C-585 gold and can be swapped with any nib of the M3xx line but not amongst other lines due to its unusually small size.  The barrels on all but the Pearl model have translucency that allow you to gauge the remaining ink level.  0.65ml ink capacity.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
4.33 in
2.68 in
1.93 in
5.12 in
0.39 in
0.37 oz 

 

M350

The M350 was released along side the M300 in 1998.  It followed the M650 and M850 which was released the year prior.  This pen only comes in one color, black with a gold vermeil cap.  These pens are distinguished from the black M300 only by their vermeil cap.  To produce vermeil, the manufacturer bonds a thin layer of very pure gold to an underlying silver base.  The cap band is stamped “925” denoting 92.5% pure sterling silver.  Like the black M300,  the pens have a black piston knob and section with a green translucent ink window.  There are two cap bands, a trim ring at the section, and two trim rings at the piston knob.  The furniture is gold-plated and the crown cap top depicts a painted two chick logo.  0.65ml ink capacity.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
4.33 in
2.68 in
1.93 in
5.12 in
0.39 in
0.56 oz 

 

M600

Originally released in 1985, the pre-’97 pens are distinguished by two cap bands, a trim ring at the section, and a thicker trim ring at the piston knob.  The furniture is gold-plated and the cap top has an etched two chick logo.  The barrel exhibits transparency to allow the ink level to be viewed on the striated models whereas an ink window serves this purpose on the solid colored models.  The black model came first in 1985 followed by the burgundy in 1989 and then the green striped in 1990.  The nib, if original, can be used to help date the pen.  They are all “logo” nibs which were 18C-750 monotone gold 1985-1988, 14C-585 two-tone gold in 1989, and 18C-750 two-tone gold from 1990 until the pen’s design change.  The post-’97 pens have a black piston knob, section, and cap.  There are two cap bands, a trim ring at the section, and two trim rings at the piston knob.  The furniture is gold-plated.  The cap top has a painted two chick logo from 1997-2003, a one chick logo from 2003-2010, and a 24K plated one chick logo cap top from 2010 to present.  The nib depicts the Pelikan logo and is a two-tone 14C-585 gold (special editions more commonly have 18C-750 gold nibs).  The barrel exhibits transparency to allow the ink level to be viewed on the striated variations whereas an ink window again serves this purpose on the solid colored models.  1.30ml ink capacity.

Trim
Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
Pre-’97
5.00 in
3.23 in
2.20 in
5.87 in
0.46 in
0.52 oz
Post-’97
5.28 in
3.27 in
2.40 in
6.10 in
0.49 in
0.57 oz

 

M605

The M605 first debuted as a special edition in solid dark blue released for the export market only in 2003 alongside the similarly colored M405 and M805, all of which are now discontinued.  There is only one trim variant and size of the M605 since it was released after the 1997 trim change.  These pens are distinguished from the M600 because they have rhodium plated furniture as opposed to yellow gold and have also been available in a few different color patterns.  The M605 pens have a crown cap top, rhodium colored trim, double trim rings at the piston knob, a trim ring at the section, and double cap bands.  The cap tops will have a painted one chick logo until 2010 at which point the logo becomes rhodium plated.  The nibs of these pens are 14C-585 two-toned gold except for the Marine Blue special edition which has a rhodium plated nib. 1.30ml ink capacity.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
5.28 in
3.27 in
2.40 in
6.10 in
0.49 in
0.57 oz 

 

M620

The M620 was a special edition of pens known as the “Cities” series, first released in 2001, all of which are now discontinued.  The purpose of the series was to honor different cities and, towards the end of the run, places from around the world.  There is only one trim variant and size of the M620 since it was released after the 1997 trim change.  These pens are distinguished from the M600 by their color patterns but are otherwise similar.  The M620 pens in general have a crown cap top, double trim rings at the piston knob, a trim ring at the section, and double cap bands.  The furniture is either yellow gold or rhodium plated depending on the aesthetics of the design.  The cap tops will have a painted two chick logo on most of the earlier models before transitioning to the one chick logo after 2003.  There is likely still some carry over of two chick cap tops after 2003 due to the utilization of old stock.  The nibs of these pens are 18C-750 two-toned gold.  Some of the barrels below exhibit translucency.  1.30ml ink capacity.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
5.28 in
3.27 in
2.40 in
6.10 in
0.49 in
0.57 oz 

 

M625

The M625 debuted in 2006 as the dark blue transparent model which was followed up by two other releases in the subsequent years.  They have since been discontinued by Pelikan.  There is only one trim variant and size of M625 since it was released after the 1997 trim change.  These pens are heavier than the M600 due to their sterling silver components.  They are distinguished from other pens in the M6xx family because they have sterling silver caps, piston knobs, and sections.  The M625 pens have a crown cap top and silver-colored trim.  There are no trim rings at the piston knob or section and there is a single cap band.  The barrels are translucent but are actually quite dark in color.  The dark blue and aubergine pens have colored bands enameled into the side of the cap.  The cap top contains the one chick Pelikan logo.  The nibs of these pens are 18C-750 rhodium plated gold.  The caps are engraved “Ag 925” along with the more typical “Pelikan Souverän Germany.”

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
5.28 in
3.27 in
2.40 in
6.10 in
0.49 in
01.05 oz 

 

M630

The M630 was released in 1999 according to Pelikan’s website and the black barreled variant is the only model in this series.  It is characterized by a black barrel in the standard post-’97 M600 size with a green ink view window.  They are somewhat heavier than the M600 due to the sterling silver cap.   The M630 has a sterling silver cap with gold-plated clip and cap bands.  The section and piston knob on these are resin as compared with the silver of the M625 series.  There are two trim rings at the piston knob, a trim ring at the section, and two cap bands.  There is a crown style cap top with a painted two chick logo.  The nib is 18C-750 two-toned gold.  Also released in 1999 was the M430, a very similarly styled but smaller pen.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
5.28 in
3.27 in
2.40 in
6.10 in
0.49 in
0.79 oz 

 

M640

The M640 line of special edition pens was initially released in 2007 starting with the models Niagara Falls and Sahara.  This was followed up with the Polar Lights, Mount Everest, Indian Summer, and Eternal Ice.  The final release occurred in 2011.  The M640 line-up all have very similar characteristics.  The barrels are made of metal and the various models have engraving/lacquer/filigree work to achieve their artistic visual effects.  These are heavy pens as depicted in the table below, heavier even than an M800 and nearly as heavy as an M1000.  The pattern on the barrel does not have a tactile feel so the finish of the pen is smooth.  There is a single trim ring at the piston knob and one on the section.  There are two cap bands and the cap top has a painted one chick Pelikan logo surrounded by rhodium trim.  The traditional “crown” cap top is absent here.  The cap clip is also not the traditional pelicans beak but rather more broad and less beak-like.  The cap, section, and barrel are made of matching colored resin.  The furniture is rhodium plated and the nibs are a monotone rhodium plated 18C-750 gold except for the Mount Everest and Sahara which feature a two-toned nib.  There is no ink view window or visualated section and the barrel has a slight bulge in the middle rather than being a straight cylinder.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
5.31 in
4.09 in
2.24 in
6.14 in
0.55 in
1.16 oz 

 

M650

The M650 debuted in 1997 in both solid black and green striated models that have long since been discontinued by Pelikan.  A red striated model is occasionally seen as well but this is not likely to be a true M650 but rather an unofficial creation by some enterprising retailers.  There is also rumor of a bordeaux model which was created as an export for the Japanese market but I have not been able to verify the actual existence of this.  These pens are distinguished only by their vermeil cap.  To produce vermeil, the manufacturer bonds a thin layer of very pure gold to an underlying silver base.  Other than their caps, these pens are essentially standard M600 models in all of their other features.  There is a crown cap top and gold-plated furniture.  There are two trim rings at the piston knob, one trim ring at the section, and there are two cap bands.  The cap band reads, “Pelikan Souverän Germany 925.”  The black barrel has a green ink view window and the striated version has transparency.  The cap top has a painted two chick logo.  The nibs are two-toned 18C-750 gold.

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
5.28 in
3.27 in
2.40 in
6.10 in
0.49 in
0.79 oz 

 

M101N

The M101N is the modern version of a line of pens that Pelikan first introduced in the 1930’s.  There were several variations released in that series, all of which command top dollar in today’s market due to their desirability.  Included in the original series were pens such as the highly sought after lizard and the tortoiseshell red.  This new series pays homage to that lineage with an updated design while still retaining the original dimensions.  The first pen released in the series was the  tortoiseshell brown in 2011.  This was followed by the lizard in 2012 and the tortoiseshell red in 2014.  The newest release in the series is the Brilliant Red (2017).  The initial MSRP of most of these pens have been around $550 though this has increased to $650 recently and they have only been produced in limited quantities.  In terms of construction, the barrels of the current production pens are made of cellulose acetate. 

Total Length
Barrel Length
Cap Length
Posted Length
Diameter
Weight
4.84 in
4.02 in
2.24 in
6.22 in
0.47 in
0.52 oz